Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Utopian urges : visions for reconstruction in Britain, 1940-1950.

Hollow, M. (2012) 'Utopian urges : visions for reconstruction in Britain, 1940-1950.', Planning perspectives., 27 (4). pp. 569-585.

Abstract

In popular culture, the 1940s have often been presented as a period in which architects and town planners became caught up in naïve, unrealistic ‘utopian fantasies’ about how to go about rebuilding Britain's bomb-damaged cities. To counter these claims, historians have increasingly sought to downplay the idealism of the period; emphasizing the pragmatic and restrained elements of the reconstruction proposals instead. This article attempts to tell a different story. Adopting a more nuanced and holistic approach to the idea of ‘utopia’, it demonstrates that, despite being highly practical and matter of fact, the reconstruction proposals put forward in this period were, nonetheless, still heavily idealistic and aspirational; suggesting that planners were, in this era at least, able to channel their ‘utopian impulses’ into visions of the future that were at once both idealistic and pragmatic.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Utopianism, 1940s, Reconstruction, Exhibitions, Housing.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (434Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02665433.2012.705126
Publisher statement:This is an electronic version of an article published in Hollow, M. (2012) 'Utopian urges : visions for reconstruction in Britain, 1940-1950.', Planning perspectives., 27 (4). pp. 569-585. Planning perspectives is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article. http://www.tandfonline.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0266-5433volume=27&issue=4&spage=569
Record Created:11 Oct 2012 11:05
Last Modified:09 Dec 2014 12:14

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library