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Refractive elements for the measurement of the orbital angular momentum of a single photon.

Lavery, Martin P. J. and Robertson, David J. and Berkhout, Gregorius C. G. and Love, Gordon D. and Padgett, Miles J. and Courtial, Johannes (2012) 'Refractive elements for the measurement of the orbital angular momentum of a single photon.', Optics express., 20 (3). pp. 2110-2115.

Abstract

We have developed a mode transformer comprising two custom refractive optical elements which convert orbital angular momentum states into transverse momentum states. This transformation allows for an efficient measurement of the orbital angular momentum content of an input light beam. We characterise the channel capacity of the system for 50 input modes, giving a maximum value of 3.46 bits per photon. Using an electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera with a laser source attenuated such that on average there is less than one photon present within the system per measurement period, we demonstrate that the elements are efficient for the use in single photon experiments.

Item Type:Article
Full text:PDF - Published Version (1517Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.002110
Publisher statement:© 2012 The Optical Society. This paper was published in Optics express and is made available as an electronic reprint with the permission of OSA. The paper can be found at the following URL on the OSA website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.002110. Systematic or multiple reproduction or distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.
Record Created:28 Nov 2012 15:50
Last Modified:29 Nov 2012 16:37

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