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Atrocity, memory, photography : imaging the concentration camps of Bosnia : the case of ITN versus Living Marxism, part 2.

Campbell, D. (2002) 'Atrocity, memory, photography : imaging the concentration camps of Bosnia : the case of ITN versus Living Marxism, part 2.', Journal of human rights., 1 (2). pp. 143-172.

Abstract

Part 1 of this article detailed the controversy surrounding the 1992 television image of Fikret Alic´ and others imprisoned at Trnopolje camp in Bosnia, demonstrating how doubts about its veracity were unsustainable. Part 2 explores the historical, political and visual context in which the particulars of the controversy are located. It explores what is involved in the concept of a 'concentration camp', as well as the nature of the Nazis' concentration camp system and the implications of this for the memory of the Holocaust and our understanding of contemporary atrocity. Then documentary evidence about the war in Bosnia is introduced in order to understand the significance of Omarska and Trnopolje in their wider context. Following that, the general question of the relationship between pictures and policy, and the specific question for the relationships between photography and the Holocaust, is considered to illuminate the larger questions of how particular atrocities are represented. Finally, the article concludes with some thoughts on the politics of critique and intellectual responsibility in instances where criticism becomes historical denial.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Bosnian War, Television, Reporting, Ethnic cleansing, Trnopolje.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14754830210125656
Record Created:07 Nov 2006
Last Modified:04 Feb 2011 12:01

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