Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Late Holocene environmental change in Disko Bugt, west Greenland : interaction between climate, ocean circulation and Jakobshavn Isbrae.

Lloyd, J. M. (2006) 'Late Holocene environmental change in Disko Bugt, west Greenland : interaction between climate, ocean circulation and Jakobshavn Isbrae.', Boreas., 35 (1). pp. 35-49.

Abstract

Foraminiferal assemblages and the sedimentology of two cores (POR20 and POR21) from eastern Disko Bugt, west Greenland, are used to identify environmental changes in the area over the past c. 2200 years. Changes in the sediment flux supplied to the core sites from Jakobshavn Isbrae are used to assess the relative position of the calving margin. An Atlantic water influence as strong as, or slightly stronger than, present prevailed at c. 2200?cal. yr BP. A trend of increasing Atlantic water influence then culminated in peak warm and saline hydrographic conditions c. 1664–474?cal. yr BP encompassing the `Medieval Warm Period'. This period was marked by a retreat of the calving front of Jakobshavn Isbrae and was followed by a marked cooling in hydrographic conditions relating to an increase in the influence of the East Greenland Current in the West Greenland Current corresponding to the climatic episode the `Little Ice Age'. A rise in sedimentation rate over this period relates to the well-documented advance of Jakobshavn Isbrae. The record from Disko Bugt shows good agreement with the temperature record from the Greenland ice cores and other climatic and oceanographic reconstructions in the region.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03009480500359061
Record Created:20 Mar 2009
Last Modified:05 Dec 2012 11:58

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library