Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Interdisciplinary approaches to the phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations.

Woods, A. and Jones, N. and Bernini, M. and Callard, F. and Alderson-Day, B. and Badcock, J. and Bell, V. and Cook, C. and Csordas, T. and Humpston, C. and Krueger, J. and Larøi, F. and McCarthy-Jones, S. and Moseley, P. and Powell, H. and Raballo, A. and Smailes, D. and Fernyhough, C. (2014) 'Interdisciplinary approaches to the phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations.', Schizophrenia bulletin., 40 (Suppl 4). S246-S254.

Abstract

Despite the recent proliferation of scientific, clinical, and narrative accounts of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), the phenomenology of voice hearing remains opaque and undertheorized. In this article, we outline an interdisciplinary approach to understanding hallucinatory experiences which seeks to demonstrate the value of the humanities and social sciences to advancing knowledge in clinical research and practice. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach to the phenomenology of AVH utilizes rigorous and context-appropriate methodologies to analyze a wider range of first-person accounts of AVH at 3 contextual levels: (1) cultural, social, and historical; (2) experiential; and (3) biographical. We go on to show that there are significant potential benefits for voice hearers, clinicians, and researchers. These include (1) informing the development and refinement of subtypes of hallucinations within and across diagnostic categories; (2) “front-loading” research in cognitive neuroscience; and (3) suggesting new possibilities for therapeutic intervention. In conclusion, we argue that an interdisciplinary approach to the phenomenology of AVH can nourish the ethical core of scientific enquiry by challenging its interpretive paradigms, and offer voice hearers richer, potentially more empowering ways to make sense of their experiences.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Auditory verbal hallucinations, Phenomenology, Interdisciplinarity, Research collaboration, Psychosis.
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
Download PDF
(324Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbu003
Publisher statement:© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Record Created:12 Nov 2014 15:05
Last Modified:28 Jul 2015 13:03

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Look up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library