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Cattle management for dairying in Scandinavia’s earliest Neolithic.

Gron, K.J. and Montgomery, J. and Rowley-Conwy, P. (2015) 'Cattle management for dairying in Scandinavia’s earliest Neolithic.', PLoS ONE., 10 (7). e0131267.

Abstract

New evidence for cattle husbandry practices during the earliest period of the southern Scandinavian Neolithic indicates multiple birth seasons and dairying from its start. Sequential sampling of tooth enamel carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratio analyses and strontium isotopic provenancing indicate more than one season of birth in locally reared cattle at the earliest Neolithic Funnel Beaker (EN I TRB, 3950-3500 cal. B.C.) site of Almhov in Scania, Sweden. The main purpose for which cattle are manipulated to give birth in more than one season is to prolong lactation for the production of milk and dairy-based products. As this is a difficult, intensive, and time-consuming strategy, these data demonstrate complex farming practices by early Neolithic farmers. This result offers strong support for immigration-based explanations of agricultural origins in southern Scandinavia on the grounds that such a specialised skill set cannot represent the piecemeal incorporation of agricultural techniques into an existing hunter-gatherer-fisher economy.

Item Type:Article
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0131267
Publisher statement:Copyright: © 2015 Gron et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Record Created:29 Jun 2015 09:20
Last Modified:20 Aug 2015 09:24

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