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A good job for a girl ? the career biographies of women graduates of the University of Liverpool post-1945.

Aiston, S. J. (2004) 'A good job for a girl ? the career biographies of women graduates of the University of Liverpool post-1945.', 20th century British history., 15 (4). pp. 361-387.

Abstract

The opponents of women’s higher education in the nineteenth century feared that a university education for women would radically alter the ‘separate spheres’ and ultimately lead to a sexual revolution. This article suggests that in terms of the career biographies of university-educated women, they need not have feared. Drawing on a range of data sources, the article documents the limited, gendered career options that faced graduate women post-1945, despite the increase in both educational and employment opportunities. There remained astounding persistence in sexist assumptions about women’s life-plans; even for the academic elite, the role of wife and mother was never lost sight of. Graduate women negotiated the labour market within the confines of a discourse that emphasized a ‘good job for a girl’ as opposed to a career for a woman.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:
Keywords:Higher education, Employment, Labour market, Sexism.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/15.4.361
Record Created:10 Jan 2007
Last Modified:08 Apr 2009 16:26

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