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Durham Research Online
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A study of the difficulties of care and support in new University teachers' work.

Walker, C. and Gleaves, A. and Grey, J. (2006) 'A study of the difficulties of care and support in new University teachers' work.', Teachers and teaching : theory and practice., 12 (3). pp. 347-363.

Abstract

This paper discusses some findings from a small‐scale qualitative study involving ‘new’ teachers in a medium sized, regional English university. Using Grounded Theory methods to inform and guide the research, the study explores participants’ views on working as both teachers and researchers whilst also managing considerable amounts of ‘caring work’ with a diverse body of students who often need academic and pastoral support in excess of that assumed within the university academic timetables or support networks. The voices of these teachers suggest that care is an overlooked aspect of university teachers’ work, yet it plays an important part in maintaining their and their students’ sense of scholarly endeavour. Further, our findings suggest that within the university at large there is a ‘discourse of difference’ in the way that many academics conceptualize and represent the student body and students’ needs to be supported. This discourse impacts on the development of new teachers’ identities and aspirations. Some implications of these findings for implementing strategies for supporting teachers to develop both academic and pastoral roles within universities are discussed.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Universities, Teaching, Students, Support, Care.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13450600500467688
Record Created:15 Jan 2007
Last Modified:04 Feb 2011 13:01

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