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Leader narcissism predicts malicious envy and supervisor-targeted counterproductive work behavior - evidence from field and experimental research.

Braun, B. and Aydin, N. and Frey, D. and Peus, C. (2018) 'Leader narcissism predicts malicious envy and supervisor-targeted counterproductive work behavior - evidence from field and experimental research.', Journal of business ethics., 151 (3). pp. 725-741.

Abstract

Building on the emotion-centered model of voluntary work behavior, this research tests the relations between leader narcissism, followers’ malicious and benign envy, and supervisor-targeted counterproductive work behavior (CWB). Results across five studies (i.e., one pilot study (N = 50), two experimental studies (N = 74 and 50), and two field surveys (N = 365 and 100) indicate that leader narcissism relates positively to followers’ negative emotions (i.e., malicious envy), which in turn mediates the positive relation between leader narcissism and supervisor-targeted CWB. Proposed negative relations between leader narcissism and positive emotions (i.e., benign envy) were only partly supported. Our findings advance the understanding of envy and the detrimental impact of leader narcissism on organizational functioning.

Item Type:Article
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-016-3224-5
Publisher statement:© The Author(s) 2016. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://crea tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Record Created:02 Jun 2016 14:05
Last Modified:21 Aug 2018 09:28

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