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Moral dominance relations for program comprehension.

Shaw, S. C. and Goldstein, M. and Munro, M. and Burd, E. (2003) 'Moral dominance relations for program comprehension.', IEEE transactions on software engineering., 29 (9). pp. 851-863.

Abstract

Dominance trees have been used as a means for reengineering legacy systems into potential reuse candidates. The dominance relation suggests the reuse candidates which are identified by strongly directly dominated subtrees. We review the approach and illustrate how the dominance tree may fail to show the relationship between the strongly direct dominated procedures and the directly dominated procedures. We introduce a relation of generalized conditional independence which strengthens the argument for the adoption of the potential reuse candidates suggested by the dominance tree and explains their relationship with the directly dominated vertices. This leads to an improved dominance tree, the moral dominance tree, which helps aid program comprehension available from the tree. The generalized conditional independence relation also identifies potential reuse candidates that are missed by the dominance relation.

Item Type:Article
Full text:PDF - Published Version (283Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TSE.2003.1232289
Publisher statement:©2003 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.
Record Created:08 Oct 2008
Last Modified:10 Aug 2011 16:35

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