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The politics of bilingualism : a reproduction analysis of the policy of mother tongue education in Hong Kong after 1997.

Lai, P-S. and Byram, M. (2003) 'The politics of bilingualism : a reproduction analysis of the policy of mother tongue education in Hong Kong after 1997.', Compare : a journal of comparative education., 33 (3). pp. 315-334.

Abstract

After the resumption of sovereignty in 1997 mother tongue education in Hong Kong, though it began with the good intention of national reintegration, politically, socially, culturally and educationally, has escalated the tensions and contradictions of the politics of bilingualism in its implementation. The government policy of bi-literacy and trilingualism addresses, rather than resolves, the problems of hegemonic struggle among different social groups in the society, and between the indigenous elite class and national ruling elites at both the local and national level. A reproduction analysis is conducted to examine the events pertinent to the language shift of English as a medium of instruction (EMI) to Chinese as a medium of instruction (CMI), with particular emphasis on controversial issues such as parental choice, antagonism of elite classes, and group politics in the face of the internationalisation of English under globalised developments of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT). English, a colonising language in the past and now a world language for changes in ICT, remains problematic for Hong Kong's language policy undergoing decolonisation and internationalisation in its early post-transitional years. Putonghua, the national language of China, challenging Cantonese, the regional dialect, as the formal and high Chinese language of the society, has added complexities to the discourse of polemical mother tongue education under the 'one country, two systems' framework practised in Hong Kong.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:After the resumption of sovereignty in 1997 mother tongue education in Hong Kong, though it began with the good intention of national reintegration, politically, socially, culturally and educationally, has escalated the tensions and contradictions of the politics of bilingualism in its implementation. The government policy of bi-literacy and trilingualism addresses, rather than resolves, the problems of hegemonic struggle among different social groups in the socity, and between the indigenous elite class and national ruling elites at both the local and national level. A reproduction analysis is conducted to examine the events pertinent to the language shift of English as a medium of instruction (EMI) to Chinese as a medium of instruction (CMI), with partiuclar emphasis on controversial issues such as parental choice, antagonism of elite classes, and group politics in the fact of the internationalisation of English under globalised developments of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT). English, a colonising language in the past and now a world language for changes in ICT, remains problematic for Hong Kong's language policy undergoing decolonisation and internationalisation in its early post-transitional years. Putonghua, the national language of China, challenging Cantonese, the regional dialiect, as the formal and high Chinese language of the society, has added complexities to the discourse of polemical mother tongue education under the 'one country', two systems' framework practised in Hong Kong.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057920302595
Record Created:31 Jan 2007
Last Modified:14 Sep 2010 16:58

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