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Exploring representativeness and reliability for late medieval earthquakes in Europe.

Forlin, P. and Gerrard, C. M. and Petley, D. (2016) 'Exploring representativeness and reliability for late medieval earthquakes in Europe.', Natural hazards., 84 (3). pp. 1625-1636.

Abstract

Seismic catalogues of past earthquakes have compiled a substantial amount of information about historical seismicity for Europe and the Mediterranean. Using two of the most recent European seismic databases (AHEAD and EMEC), this paper employs GIS spatial analysis (kernel density estimation) to explore the representativeness and reliability of data captured for late medieval earthquakes. We identify those regions where the occurrence of earthquakes is significantly higher or lower than expected values and investigate possible reasons for these discrepancies. The nature of the seismic events themselves, the methodology employed during catalogue compilation and the availability of medieval written records are all briefly explored.

Item Type:Article
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11069-016-2502-y
Publisher statement:This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Record Created:29 Jul 2016 09:51
Last Modified:25 Nov 2016 15:02

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