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Plants capable of selfing are more likely to become naturalized.

Razanajatovo, M. and Maurel, N. and Dawson, W. and Essl, F. and Kreft, H. and Pergl, J. and Pyšek, P. and Weigelt, P. and Winter, M. and van Kleunen, M. (2016) 'Plants capable of selfing are more likely to become naturalized.', Nature communications., 7 . p. 13313.

Abstract

Many plant species have established self-sustaining populations outside their natural range because of human activities. Plants with selfing ability should be more likely to establish outside their historical range because they can reproduce from a single individual when mates or pollinators are not available. Here, we compile a global breeding-system database of 1,752 angiosperm species and use phylogenetic generalized linear models and path analyses to test relationships between selfing ability, life history, native range size and global naturalization status. Selfing ability is associated with annual or biennial life history and a large native range, which both positively correlate with the probability of naturalization. Path analysis suggests that a high selfing ability directly increases the number of regions where a species is naturalized. Our results provide robust evidence across flowering plants at the global scale that high selfing ability fosters alien plant naturalization both directly and indirectly.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
First Live Deposit - 10 November 2016
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/NCOMMS13313
Publisher statement:This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Record Created:10 Nov 2016 09:35
Last Modified:10 Nov 2016 11:35

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