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Exploring strategies and dynamic capabilities for net formation and management.

Schepis, D. and Ellis, N. and Purchase, S. (2018) 'Exploring strategies and dynamic capabilities for net formation and management.', Industrial marketing management., 74 . pp. 115-125.

Abstract

Nets represent forms of inter-organizational collaboration in networks in which actors can pursue complex objectives beyond their individual resources or abilities. Firms seeking to effectively form and manage nets face challenges in understanding how to strategically influence others and recognizing facilitative dynamic capabilities. To address these challenges, this research examines the way strategies are implemented at different net levels, distinguishing between supply chain and industry nets. This is explored through an empirical case study focusing on the integration of Indigenous contracting into the Western Australian mining industry. A theoretical framework is developed outlining the relevant capabilities utilized by actors across net formation and management stages. This offers an explicit understanding of how actors shift from direct to more subtle forms of influence and effectively ‘co-orchestrate’ nets with competitors.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Publisher-imposed embargo until 15 October 2019.
(AM) Accepted Manuscript
First Live Deposit - 05 December 2016
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.
File format - PDF
(664Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.09.023
Publisher statement:© 2017 This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Record Created:05 Dec 2016 11:43
Last Modified:23 Oct 2018 09:12

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