Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

The RooPfs study to assess whether improved housing provides additional protection against clinical malaria over current best practice in The Gambia : study protocol for a randomized controlled study and ancillary studies.

Pinder, M. and Conteh, L. and Jeffries, D. and Jones, C. and Knudsen, J. and Kandeh, B. and Jawara, M. and Sicuri, E. and D'Alessandro, U. and Lindsay, S.W. (2016) 'The RooPfs study to assess whether improved housing provides additional protection against clinical malaria over current best practice in The Gambia : study protocol for a randomized controlled study and ancillary studies.', Trials., 17 (1). p. 275.

Abstract

Background In malaria-endemic areas, residents of modern houses have less malaria than those living in traditional houses. This study will determine if modern housing provides incremental protection against clinical malaria over the current best practice of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and prompt treatment in The Gambia, determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of the interventions, and analyze the housing market in The Gambia. Methods/design A two-armed, household, cluster-randomized, controlled study will be conducted to assess whether improved housing and LLINs combine to provide better protection against clinical malaria in children than LLINs alone in The Gambia. The unit of randomization will be the household, defined as a house and its occupants. A total of 800 households will be enrolled and will receive LLINs, and 400 will receive improved housing before clinical follow-up. One child aged 6 months to 13 years will be enrolled from each household and followed for clinical malaria using active case detection to estimate malaria incidence for two malaria transmission seasons. Episodes of clinical malaria will be the primary endpoint. Study children will be surveyed at the end of each transmission season to estimate the prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum infection, parasite density, and the prevalence of anemia. Exposure to malaria parasites will be assessed using light traps, followed by detection of Anopheles gambiae species and sporozoite infection. Ancillary economic and social science studies will undertake a cost-effectiveness analysis and use qualitative and participatory methods to explore the acceptability of the housing modifications and to design strategies for scaling-up housing interventions. Discussion The study is the first of its kind to measure the efficacy of housing on reducing clinical malaria, assess the incremental cost-effectiveness of improved housing, and identify mechanisms for scaling up housing interventions. Trial findings will help inform policy makers on improved housing for malaria control in sub-Saharan Africa. Trial registration ISRCTN Registry, ISRCTN02622179. Registered on 23 September 2014.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
First Live Deposit - 09 December 2016
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
Download PDF
(1053Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-016-1400-7
Publisher statement:This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Record Created:09 Dec 2016 10:43
Last Modified:09 Dec 2016 11:24

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Look up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library