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Sleep duration and adiposity in early childhood : evidence for bidirectional associations from the Born in Bradford study.

Collings, P. and Ball, H. and Santorelli, G. and West, J. and Barber, S. and McEachan, R. and Wright, J. (2016) 'Sleep duration and adiposity in early childhood : evidence for bidirectional associations from the Born in Bradford study.', Sleep., 40 (2). zsw054.

Abstract

Study Objectives: To examine independent associations of sleep duration with total and abdominal adiposity, and the bidirectionality of these associations, in a young bi-ethnic sample of children from a disadvantaged location. Methods: Child sleep duration (h/day) was parent-reported by questionnaire and indices of total (body weight, body mass index, percent body fat (%BF), sum of skinfolds) and abdominal adiposity (waist circumference) were measured using standard anthropometric procedures at approximately 12, 18, 24, and 36 months of age in 1,338 children (58% South Asian; 42% White). Mixed effects models were used to quantify independent associations (expressed as standardised β-coefficients (95% confidence interval (CI)) of sleep duration with adiposity indices using data from all four time-points. Factors considered for adjustment in models included basic demographics, pregnancy and birth characteristics, and lifestyle behaviours. Results: With the exception of the sum of skinfolds, sleep duration was inversely and independently associated with indices of total and abdominal adiposity in South Asian children. For example, one standard deviation (SD) higher sleep duration was associated with reduced %BF by -0.029 (95% CI: −0.053, −0.0043) SDs. Higher adiposity was also independently associated with shorter sleep duration in South Asian children (for example, %BF: β= -0.10 (−0.16, −0.028) SDs). There were no significant associations in White children. Conclusions: Associations between sleep duration and adiposity are bidirectional and independent among South Asian children from a disadvantaged location. The results highlight the importance of considering adiposity as both a determinant of decreased sleep and a potential consequence.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
First Live Deposit - 15 December 2016
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.
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Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsw054
Publisher statement:This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
Record Created:15 Dec 2016 11:44
Last Modified:17 Feb 2017 10:02

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