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Durham Research Online
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Stress and stereotypes : children's reactions to the outbreak of foot and mouth disease in the UK in 2001.

Nerlich, B. and Hillyard, S. H. and Wright, N. (2005) 'Stress and stereotypes : children's reactions to the outbreak of foot and mouth disease in the UK in 2001.', Children & society., 19 (5). pp. 384-359.

Abstract

In 2001 foot and mouth disease broke out in the UK and millions of farm animals were slaughtered in order to eradicate it. This affected farmers, town dwellers, adults and children. Based on a small sample of 56 e-mails to a children's BBC (CBBC) message board and using an ethnomethodological approach, this article explores the way in which children in rural and urban areas responded to the effects of this epidemic and how they structured their understandings of one another through the use of rural and urban stereotypes. It shows that the stress felt by some of the children who lived on or near infected farms during the outbreak was exacerbated by the fact that they felt misunderstood by other children living in surroundings not directly affected by foot and mouth disease.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/chi.845
Record Created:15 Mar 2007
Last Modified:20 May 2011 16:37

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