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The origins of iconic depictions : a falsifiable model derived from the visual science of palaeolithic cave art and world rock art.

Hodgson, D. and Pettitt, P. B. (2018) 'The origins of iconic depictions : a falsifiable model derived from the visual science of palaeolithic cave art and world rock art.', Cambridge archaeological journal., 28 (4). pp. 591-612.

Abstract

Archaeologists have struggled for more than a century to explain why the first representational art of the Upper Palaeolithic arose and the reason for its precocious naturalism. Thanks to new data from various sites across Europe and further afield, as well as crucial insights from visual science, we may now be on the brink of bringing some clarity to this issue. In this paper, we assert that the main precursors of the first figurative art consisted of hand prints/stencils (among the Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens) and a corpus of geometric marks as well as a hunting lifestyle and highly charged visual system for detecting animals in evocative environments. Unlike many foregoing arguments, the present one is falsifiable in that five critical, but verifiable, points are delineated.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
First Live Deposit - 16 May 2018
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0959774318000227
Publisher statement:This article has been published in a revised form in Cambridge archaeological journal https://doi.org/10.1017/S0959774318000227. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research 2018.
Record Created:16 May 2018 11:58
Last Modified:25 Sep 2018 10:41

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