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Can sectionalism be good for solidarity? Some evidence from the maritime construction industry on Tyneside.

McBride, Jo (2011) 'Can sectionalism be good for solidarity? Some evidence from the maritime construction industry on Tyneside.', Economic and industrial democracy., 32 (2). pp. 285-306.

Abstract

Sectionalism has historically been viewed as negative in that it isolates workers from a shared sense of a collective identity thereby weakening solidarity. This paper considers the alternative argument that sectionalism can be good for solidarity. It does this by measuring the collective identity of the workforce in the Tyneside Maritime Construction Industry (TMCI) using mobilization theory as a tool for measurement. It discovers that the collective identity does not necessarily develop in one setting but can develop in different stages and at different levels. It also finds that workers may have an association with different collective identities and therefore, the collective identity may take different forms. The collective identity can also divide as well as unite, which implies ‘solidarity within sectionalism’, and in turn it is argued that this brings positivity to the TMCI workforce’s shared collective identity.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
First Live Deposit - 10 July 2018
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1177/0143831X10377807
Publisher statement:McBride, Jo (2011). Can sectionalism be good for solidarity? Some evidence from the maritime construction industry on Tyneside. Economic and Industrial Democracy 32(2): 285-306. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
Record Created:10 Jul 2018 10:28
Last Modified:10 Jul 2018 11:25

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