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Training together : an exploration of a shared learning approach to dual diagnosis training for specialist drugs workers and Approved Social Workers (ASWs).

Bailey, D. (2002) 'Training together : an exploration of a shared learning approach to dual diagnosis training for specialist drugs workers and Approved Social Workers (ASWs).', Social work education., 21 (5). pp. 565-581.

Abstract

This paper is the first of two linked articles exploring a shared learning approach to developing 'professional collaboration' as one way of improving care for people with complex inter-related mental health and substance misuse needs. The target groups for the training in this study are Approved Social Workers (ASWs) and specialist drugs workers. The article describes the social and professional contexts that shape the different training agendas for the respective groups of workers in an attempt to identify common themes that can be used as a foundation for developing training solutions. The relevance of a shared learning method of training delivery is critically discussed and the way in which this was adapted to respond to training needs identified in Birmingham is outlined. The paper concludes by suggesting that training providers should be encouraged to identify the common agenda for drugs workers and ASWs working with people with mental health and substance use needs and utilise a shared learning methodology to respond in a proactive way to improving service delivery through effective training. The second paper provides an in-depth exploration of the training delivered. Using a formative evaluation framework the paper reflects upon the methods employed to: •identify curriculum content; •promote collaborative working through different approaches to interprofessional learning; and •demonstrate how the training is impacting on practice outcomes.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0261547022000015249
Record Created:29 Mar 2007
Last Modified:12 Feb 2010 22:21

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