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Self-perceived attractiveness influences human female preferences for sexual dimorphism and symmetry in male faces.

Little, A. C. and Burt, D. M. and Penton-Voak, I. S. and Perrett, D. I. (2001) 'Self-perceived attractiveness influences human female preferences for sexual dimorphism and symmetry in male faces.', Proceedings of the Royal Society series B : biological sciences., 268 (1462). pp. 39-44.

Abstract

Exaggerated sexual dimorphism and symmetry in human faces have both been linked to potential 'good-gene' benefits and have also been found to influence the attractiveness of male faces. The current study explores how female self-rated attractiveness influences male face preference in females using faces manipulated with computer graphics. The study demonstrates that there is a relatively increased preference for masculinity and an increased preference for symmetry for women who regard themselves as attractive. This finding may reflect a condition-dependent mating strategy analogous to behaviours found in other species. The absence of a preference for proposed markers of good genes may be adaptive in women of low mate value to avoid the costs of decreased parental investment from the owners of such characteristics.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Facial attractiveness, Female preference, Good-gene markers, Mate value.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2000.1327
Record Created:30 Mar 2007
Last Modified:18 Aug 2010 12:14

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