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The legend of Basil the Bulgar-slayer.

Stephenson, P. (2003) 'The legend of Basil the Bulgar-slayer.', Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Abstract

The reign of Basil II (976–1025), the longest of any Byzantine emperor, has long been considered as a ‘golden age’, in which his greatest achievement was the annexation of Bulgaria. This, we have been told, was achieved through a long and bloody war of attrition which won Basil the grisly epithet Voulgartoktonos, ‘the Bulgar-slayer’. In this new study Paul Stephenson argues that neither of these beliefs is true. Instead, Basil fought far more sporadically in the Balkans and his reputation as ‘Bulgar-slayer’ was created only a century and a half later. Thereafter the ‘Bulgar-slayer’ was periodically to play a galvanizing role for the Byzantines, returning to centre-stage as Greeks struggled to establish a modern nation state. As Byzantium was embraced as the Greek past by scholars and politicians, the ‘Bulgar-slayer’ became an icon in the struggle for Macedonia (1904–8) and the Balkan Wars (1912–13). • A broadly-based, accessible book which spans history, art history and literature in both the medieval and modern periods • Addresses major issues in national history and nationalism in Byzantium and Greece through the ages • Illustrated in colour and black-and-white with rare and unusual images

Item Type:Book
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521815307
Record Created:30 Mar 2007
Last Modified:20 Jan 2011 16:19

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