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What was the ecological impact of a Trypillia mega-site occupation? multi-proxy palaeo-environmental investigations at Nebelivka, Ukraine.

Albert, Bruce and Innes, Jim and Krementskiy, Konstantin and Millard, Andrew and Gaydarska, Bisserka and Nebbia, Marco and Chapman, John (2020) 'What was the ecological impact of a Trypillia mega-site occupation? multi-proxy palaeo-environmental investigations at Nebelivka, Ukraine.', Vegetation history and archaeobotany., 29 (1). pp. 15-34.

Abstract

Fine-resolution sampling of pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs and microcharcoal as well as sedimentological data in a 6-m sediment core were used to reconstruct both natural conditions and human impacts in the late fifth and early fourth millennia cal bc in the environs of the Nebelivka megasite in Kirovograd Oblast, Central Ukraine. This 238-ha site, dating to the Middle (or BII) Phase of the Trypillia culture, represents one of the first low-density urban establishments in Europe. Despite what was believed to be a sizable population, local human impacts reconstructed from the multi-proxy palaeo-ecological record were moderate in character. There was no positive evidence to indicate a depositional hiatus in the P1 core and no sign of a major ecological impact at any stage in the high-resolution record. The palaeo-ecological record indicates modest settlement agglomeration with less permanent populations rather than permanent populations of tens of thousands of people.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Publisher-imposed embargo
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Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00334-019-00730-9
Publisher statement:© The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Date accepted:01 April 2019
Date deposited:04 April 2019
Date of first online publication:07 May 2019
Date first made open access:08 January 2020

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