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Transfer of spatial behavior between different environments : implications for theories of spatial learning and for the role of the hippocampus in spatial learning.

Pearce, J. M. and Good, M. A. and Jones, P. M. and McGregor, A. (2004) 'Transfer of spatial behavior between different environments : implications for theories of spatial learning and for the role of the hippocampus in spatial learning.', Journal of experimental psychology : animal behavior processes., 30 (2). pp. 135-147.

Abstract

In 3 experiments, rats were required to find a submerged platform located in 1 corner of an arena that had 2 long and 2 short sides; they were then trained to find the platform in a new arena that also had 2 long and 2 short sides but a different overall shape. The platform in the new arena was easier to find if it was in a corner that was geometrically equivalent, rather than the mirror image, of the corner where it had previously been located. The final experiment revealed that hippocampal lesions impaired rats' ability to find the platform in these arenas. The results suggest that rats did not use the overall shape of the arena to locate the platform but relied on more local cues and that the hippocampus plays a role in navigation based on these cues.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0097-7403.30.2.135
Record Created:26 Jan 2009
Last Modified:26 Sep 2012 11:15

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