Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Contribution of strontium to the human diet from querns and millstones : an experiment in digestive strontium isotope uptake.

Johnson, Lucie and Montgomery, Janet and Evans, Jane and Hamilton, Elliot (2019) 'Contribution of strontium to the human diet from querns and millstones : an experiment in digestive strontium isotope uptake.', Archaeometry., 61 (6). pp. 1366-1381.

Abstract

The question of whether rock grit ingested unintentionally from querns, metates or millstones or deliberately through pica or geophagy is bioaccessible in the human gut has not been addressed in archaeological Sr-isotope studies. This study employed the Unified Bioaccessibility Method and determined that ingested rock grit can provide bioaccessible 87Sr/86Sr, but that unintentional consumption is unlikely to constitute more than 1% of the diet (by mass) and will not significantly change, i.e. by > 0.001, human skeletal 87Sr/86Sr. The use of locally or non-locally sourced querns or millstones will not affect the interpretation of archaeological human 87Sr/86Sr values in Britain. Keywords: Strontium, 87Sr/86Sr, bioaccessible, quern, millstone, grinding stone, metates, human diet, Millstone Grit, Pennant sandstone, Eskdale granite.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
Download PDF (Advance online version)
(421Kb)
Full text:Publisher-imposed embargo
(AM) Accepted Manuscript
First Live Deposit - 17 May 2019
File format - PDF
(315Kb)
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
Download PDF
(471Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1111/arcm.12485
Publisher statement:© 2019 The Authors Archaeometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of University of Oxford. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Record Created:16 May 2019 14:28
Last Modified:05 Nov 2019 15:34

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Look up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library