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Rapid CO2 mineralisation into calcite at the CarbFix storage site quantified using calcium isotopes.

Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A. E. and Burton, Kevin W. and Snæbjörnsdóttir, Sandra O. and Sigfússon, Bergur and Aradóttir, Edda S. and Gunnarsson, Ingvi and Alfredsson, Helgi A. and Mesfin, Kiflom G. and Oelkers, Eric H. and Gislason, Sigurður R. (2019) 'Rapid CO2 mineralisation into calcite at the CarbFix storage site quantified using calcium isotopes.', Nature communications., 10 (1). p. 1983.

Abstract

The engineered removal of atmospheric CO2 is now considered a key component of mitigating climate warming below 1.5 °C. Mineral carbonation is a potential negative emissions technique that, in the case of Iceland’s CarbFix experiment, precipitates dissolved CO2 as carbonate minerals in basaltic groundwater settings. Here we use calcium (Ca) isotopes in both pre- and post-CO2 injection waters to quantify the amount of carbonate precipitated, and hence CO2 stored. Ca isotope ratios rapidly increase with the pH and calcite saturation state, indicating calcite precipitation. Calculations suggest that up to 93% of dissolved Ca is removed into calcite during certain phases of injection. In total, our results suggest that 165 ± 8.3 t CO2 were precipitated into calcite, an overall carbon storage efficiency of 72 ± 5%. The success of this approach opens the potential for quantification of similar mineral carbonation efforts where drawdown rates cannot be estimated by other means.

Item Type:Article
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10003-8
Publisher statement:This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Date accepted:08 April 2019
Date deposited:29 May 2019
Date of first online publication:30 April 2019
Date first made open access:No date available

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