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Belief in conspiracy theories and intentions to engage in everyday crime.

Jolley, Daniel and Douglas, Karen M. and Leite, Ana C. and Schrader, Tanya (2019) 'Belief in conspiracy theories and intentions to engage in everyday crime.', British journal of social psychology., 58 (3). pp. 534-549.

Abstract

Belief in conspiracy theories is associated with negative outcomes such as political disengagement, prejudice, and environmental inaction. The current studies – one cross‐sectional (N = 253) and one experimental (N = 120) – tested the hypothesis that belief in conspiracy theories would increase intentions to engage in everyday crime. Study 1 demonstrated that belief in conspiracy theories predicted everyday crime behaviours when controlling for other known predictors of everyday crime (e.g., Honesty–Humility). Study 2 demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories (vs. control) increased intentions to engage in everyday crime in the future, through an increased feeling of anomie. The perception that others have conspired may therefore in some contexts lead to negative action rather than inaction.

Item Type:Article
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12311
Publisher statement:This is the accepted version of the following article: Jolley, Daniel, Douglas, Karen M., Leite, Ana C. & Schrader, Tanya (2019). Belief in conspiracy theories and intentions to engage in everyday crime. British Journal of Social Psychology 58(3): 534-549, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12311. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.
Record Created:13 Jun 2019 11:58
Last Modified:19 Jan 2020 01:05

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