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The benefits of turbine endwall profiling in a cascade.

Ingram, G. and Gregory-Smith, D. and Harvey, N. (2005) 'The benefits of turbine endwall profiling in a cascade.', Proceedings of the I MECH E part A : journal of power and energy., 219 (1). pp. 49-59.

Abstract

Non-axisymmetric profiled endwalls have been shown to reduce losses and secondary flow both in cascades and in rig tests. This paper presents experimental results which quantify the benefits of loss reduction in the cascade with particular attention to accuracy. The paper compares the benefits achieved in experiment to the results predicted by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The results show that both the experiment and CFD give significant reductions in secondary flow. A reduction of 31 per cent in secondary loss has been measured for the best case, but the CFD gives only a small reduction in loss. Previous studies on the planar endwall have shown significant areas of transitional flow, so the surface flow has been studied with the aid of surface-mounted hot films. It was concluded that the loss reductions were not due to changes in regions of laminar and turbulent flow.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Turbine blades, Secondary flow, Experiment, CFD.
Full text:PDF - Published Version (1558Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/095765005X6863
Publisher statement:© Ingram, G. and Gregory-Smith, D. and Harvey, N., 2005. The definitive, peer reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Proceedings of the I MECH E part A : journal of power and energy, 219, 1, pp. 49-59, 10.1243/095765005X6863
Record Created:25 Feb 2008
Last Modified:31 May 2011 16:33

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