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Parallel declines in pollinators and insect-pollinated plants in Britain and the Netherlands.

Biesmeijer, J. C. and Roberts, S. P. M. and Reemer, M. and Ohlemuller, R. and Edwards, M. and Peeters, T. and Schaffers, A. P. and Potts, S. G. and Kleukers, R. and Thomas, C. D. and Settele, J. and Kunin, W. E. (2006) 'Parallel declines in pollinators and insect-pollinated plants in Britain and the Netherlands.', Science., 313 (5785). pp. 351-354.

Abstract

Despite widespread concern about declines in pollination services, little is known about the patterns of change in most pollinator assemblages. By studying bee and hoverfly assemblages in Britain and the Netherlands, we found evidence of declines (pre-versus post-1980) in local bee diversity in both countries; however, divergent trends were observed in hoverflies. Depending on the assemblage and location, pollinator declines were most frequent in habitat and flower specialists, in univoltine species, and/or in nonmigrants. In conjunction with this evidence, outcrossing plant species that are reliant on the declining pollinators have themselves declined relative to other plant species. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest a causal connection between local extinctions of functionally linked plant and pollinator species.

Item Type:Article
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Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1127863
Record Created:18 May 2007
Last Modified:08 Apr 2009 16:32

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