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Stable isotope evidence for increasing dietary breadth in the European mid-Upper Paleolithic.

Richards, M. P. and Pettitt, P. B. and Stiner, M. C. and Trinkaus, E. (2001) 'Stable isotope evidence for increasing dietary breadth in the European mid-Upper Paleolithic.', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America., 98 (11). pp. 6528-6532.

Abstract

New carbon and nitrogen stable isotope values for human remains dating to the mid-Upper Paleolithic in Europe indicate significant amounts of aquatic (fish, mollusks, and/or birds) foods in some of their diets. Most of this evidence points to exploitation of inland freshwater aquatic resources in particular. By contrast, European Neandertal collagen carbon and nitrogen stable isotope values do not indicate significant use of inland aquatic foods but instead show that they obtained the majority of their protein from terrestrial herbivores. In agreement with recent zooarcheological analyses, the isotope results indicate shifts toward a more broad-spectrum subsistence economy in inland Europe by the mid-Upper Paleolithic period, probably associated with significant population increases.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.111155298
Record Created:07 Apr 2009
Last Modified:21 Jul 2010 16:58

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