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Daydreams and anarchy : a defense of anomalous mental causation.

Zangwill, N. (2006) 'Daydreams and anarchy : a defense of anomalous mental causation.', Philosophy and phenomenological research., 73 (2). pp. 253-289.

Abstract

Must mental properties figure in psychological causal laws if they are causally efficacious? And do those psychological causal laws give the essence of mental properties? Contrary to the prevailing consensus, I argue that, on the usual conception of laws that is in play in these debates, there are in fact lawless causally efficacious properties both in and out of the philosophy of mind. I argue that this makes a great difference to the philosophical relevance of empirical psychology. 1 begin by making the case that revolutions and hurricanes are lawless phenomena, before arguing for a similar thesis about creativity, love, courage, dreams, daydreams, and musings. Furthermore, the empirical research on these phenomena suggests that the philosophical issues may be independent of what empirical psychology can tell us.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1933-1592.2006.tb00618.x
Record Created:16 Jul 2007
Last Modified:07 Sep 2010 10:01

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