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Non-verbal meaning in Caroline private theatre : William Cavendish's and James Shirley's 'The Varietie'(c.1641).

Ravelhofer, B. (2006) 'Non-verbal meaning in Caroline private theatre : William Cavendish's and James Shirley's 'The Varietie'(c.1641).', The seventeenth century., 21 (2). pp. 195-214.

Abstract

How did early modern actors convey meaning on stage without speaking? A few plays of the Caroline period developed an extraordinary taste for non-verbal communication by costume, movements, stage design and the like. Drawing upon 'The Varietie'(c.1641), a comedy written by William Cavendish and James Shirley, this essay explores the impact of seventeenth-century fashion, dancing practice, and the conventions of court masques on Caroline private theatre.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Shirley, James, Cavendish, William, Masque, Early dance, Costume.
Full text:PDF - Published Version (272Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://journals.mup.man.ac.uk/cgi-bin/MUP?COMval=issue&key=SVC_21@2
Record Created:22 Aug 2007
Last Modified:04 Nov 2010 17:03

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