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"Seven million Londoners, one London" : national and urban ideas of community in the aftermath of the 7 July 2005 bombings in London.

Closs, S. A. (2007) '"Seven million Londoners, one London" : national and urban ideas of community in the aftermath of the 7 July 2005 bombings in London.', Alternatives., 32 (2). pp. 155-176.

Abstract

This article explores the different ideas of community circulating in the aftermath of the 7 July 2005 bombings in London. Specifically, it compares the idea of a community in unity with a more cosmopolitan, urban idea of community. While these two ideas seem to present sharply different responses, the article questions the extent to which the cosmopolitan model offers an alternative to the nationalist idea of community. Drawing on various discussions about how ideas of community are produced through different understandings of time and origins, the article argues that in this specific case both the national and the cosmopolitan accounts of community worked according to a very similar logic, and therefore risked reproducing similar problems and exclusions. Consequently, the article suggests that the task of exploring alternative conceptions of community must involve greater sensitivity to the politics of time and other approaches to the politics of origins. This challenge is pursued through the motif of the city as a site expressing a different temporality and thus a different idea of community from that expressed in traditions of national belonging.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Community, Unity, City, Time, Origins, Alternatives.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://www.rienner.com/altab322.htm
Record Created:21 Sep 2007
Last Modified:01 Jun 2009 15:56

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