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Governance through publicity : anti-social behaviour orders, young people and the problematization of the right to anonymity.

Cobb, N. (2007) 'Governance through publicity : anti-social behaviour orders, young people and the problematization of the right to anonymity.', Journal of law and society., 34 (3). pp. 342-373.

Abstract

Since the early twentieth century, young people under eighteen involved in legal proceedings have been granted a degree of protection from the glare of media publicity. One controversial consequence of recent reforms of the anti-social behaviour order (ASBO), however, is the incremental reduction in the anonymity rights available to those subject to the mechanism, together with calls by the Home Office for details of such individuals to be publicized as a matter of course. Numerous commentators have criticized the government accordingly for reinstating the draconian practice of ‘naming and shaming’. This paper contends that these developments can be usefully analysed through the lens of Foucault's work on state governance. It explores, in particular, how challenges to the right reflect both the fall of anonymity and the rise of publicity in the governance of what I term ‘ASBO subjects’, together with the communities in which they live, under ‘advanced liberal’ rule.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Governmentality, Anti-social behaviour, ASBO, Children and young people, Anonymity.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (177Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6478.2007.00396.x
Publisher statement:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Record Created:22 Sep 2008
Last Modified:07 Sep 2011 16:33

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