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Reflections on the roles and performance of international organisations in supporting children separated from their families by war.

Charnley, H. M. (2007) 'Reflections on the roles and performance of international organisations in supporting children separated from their families by war.', Ethics and social welfare., 1 (3). pp. 253-268.

Abstract

During the 16-year civil war in Mozambique thousands of children were separated from their families as a direct or indirect result of conflict and displacement. International organizations lent support to a national family tracing and reunification programme coordinated by the government Department for Social Action. Drawing on the findings of an empirical study of the sustainability of substitute family care, this article describes the tensions associated with the involvement of international organizations during the emergency conditions of the war, in post-war rehabilitation and in longer term development. It explores the ethical dimensions of social welfare interventions across borders and continents and concludes by arguing a case for international humanitarian agencies to base their interventions to 'help' separated children on deeper knowledges of the social and political history, and the values, beliefs and normative practices of the populations with whom they work.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Separated children, International organizations, War, NGOs, Accountability.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17496530701602774
Record Created:04 Aug 2008
Last Modified:20 Aug 2010 10:29

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