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Durham Research Online
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What children know and can do when they start school and how this varies between countries.

Merrell, C. and Tymms, P. (2007) 'What children know and can do when they start school and how this varies between countries.', Journal of early childhood research., 5 (2). pp. 115-134.

Abstract

This large-scale study describes what children know and can do when they start school in Scotland. The description became possible because a third of Scottish Authorities are involved in a single, broadly based, on-entry baseline assessment of children. The study also looked at variations by home background, sex, age and pre-school experience within Scotland. Comparisons were then made with the cognitive development of children starting school in England, New Zealand and Western Australia, concentrating on children whose first language was English. Surprising differences were found between Scotland and other countries. New Zealand also stood out on some measures. The results are discussed in terms of pre-school provision and what on-entry assessment can and cannot tell us.

Item Type:Article
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (435Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1476718X07076679
Publisher statement:The final definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal Journal of Early Childhood Research 5/2 2007 © <SAGE Publications Ltd 2007> by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Journal Journal of Early Childhood page: http://ecr.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/
Record Created:27 Jan 2009
Last Modified:09 Sep 2011 16:46

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