Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

British-German relations and collective memory.

Wittlinger, R. (2007) 'British-German relations and collective memory.', German politics and society., 25 (3). pp. 42-69.

Abstract

British-German relations have undergone a considerable transformation since 1945 with both countries having to adapt to significant changes in their own status, as well as a very different international environment. Germany's status as a morally and militarily defeated and occupied power in 1945 is in stark contrast to the confident role it is playing at the beginning of the new millennium when—sixty years after the end of World War II—the German chancellor for the first time took part in the VE-Day celebrations of the victors. This article analyzes recent dynamics of collective memory in both countries and examine if and to what extent their collective memories play a role in British-German relations.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:British-German relations, Collective memory, World War II, National socialism, National identity, Britain, Germany.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.3167/gps.2007.250303
Record Created:24 Mar 2009
Last Modified:08 Apr 2009 16:38

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library