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Increasing children's participation in African transport planning : reflections on methodological issues in a child-centred research project.

Porter, G. and Abane, A. (2008) 'Increasing children's participation in African transport planning : reflections on methodological issues in a child-centred research project.', Children's geographies., 6 (2). pp. 151-167.

Abstract

This paper examines the potential for applying child-centred research methodologies which involve children doing their own research (with adult facilitators) within a transport and mobility context in West Africa. Relatively little attention has been paid to the transport needs of the poor and powerless within African transport policy and planning: the specifics of children and young people's transport and mobility needs are essentially unknown and unconsidered. Using evidence from a small pilot study in Ghana, we reflect on both the opportunities and the challenges of work in this field. Although the paper is focused on the specific issues raised by child-centred research, it raises broader questions regarding the potential for research partnerships with vulnerable groups and, more specifically, the challenges of developing more collaborative research processes within transport studies, where technical priorities still regularly triumph over social concerns.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Child-centred research, Participation, Transport, Ghana, Africa, Methodology.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (452Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14733280801963086
Publisher statement:This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Children's Geographies on 30/09/2008, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14733280801963086.
Record Created:04 Jul 2008
Last Modified:19 Nov 2014 15:46

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