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The development of change blindness : children's attentional priorities whilst viewing naturalistic scenes.

Fletcher-Watson, S. and Colli, J. M. and Findlay, J. M. and Fletcher- Watson, S. and Leekam, S. R. (2009) 'The development of change blindness : children's attentional priorities whilst viewing naturalistic scenes.', Developmental science., 12 (3). pp. 438-445.

Abstract

Change blindness describes the surprising difficulty of detecting large changes in visual scenes when changes occur during a visual disruption. In order to study the developmental course of this phenomenon, a modified version of the flicker paradigm, based on Rensink, O'Regan & Clark (1997), was given to three groups of children aged 6–12 years and to a group of adults. This paradigm tested the ability to detect single colour, presence/absence and location changes of both high and low semantic importance in a complex scene. Semantically important changes were detected more quickly and accurately than less semantically important changes, by all age groups, indicating that children had the same attentional priorities as adults. Older children achieved more efficient and accurate detection of changes than younger children and reached almost adult level at 10–12 years old. These improvements parallel age-related developments in attention and visual perception.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00784.x
Record Created:24 Sep 2008
Last Modified:13 Nov 2012 15:14

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