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Prevention of childhood obesity.

Ells, L.J. and Campbell, K. and Lidstone, J. and Kelly, S. and Lang, R. and Summerbell, C.D. (2005) 'Prevention of childhood obesity.', Best practice & research clinical endocrinology & metabolism., 19 (3). pp. 441-454.

Abstract

Childhood obesity is a complex disease with different genetic, metabolic, environmental and behavioural components that are interrelated and potentially confounding, thus making causal pathways difficult to define. Given the tracking of obesity and the associated risk factors, childhood is an important period for prevention. To date, evidence would support preventative interventions that encourage physical activity and a healthy diet, restrict sedentary activities and offer behavioural support. However, these interventions should involve not only the child but the whole family, school and community. If the current global obesity epidemic is to be halted, further large-scale, well-designed prevention studies are required, particularly within settings outside of the USA, in order to expand the currently limited evidence base upon which clinical recommendations and public health approaches can be formulated. This must be accompanied by enhanced monitoring of paediatric obesity prevalence and continued support from all stakeholders at global, national, regional and local levels.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Childhood, Obesity prevention, Physical activity, Healthy diet, Sedentary behaviour, Ante/postnatal, Body mass index, Waist circumference, School, Community, Government.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beem.2005.04.008
Record Created:27 May 2009 16:20
Last Modified:09 Jul 2013 16:28

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