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Neanderthals in Central Asia and Siberia.

Krause, J. and Orlando, L. and Serre, D. and Viola, B. and Prüfer, K. and Richards, M. P. and Hublin, J. J. and Hänni, C. and Derevianko, A. P. and Pääbo, S. (2007) 'Neanderthals in Central Asia and Siberia.', Nature., 449 (7164). pp. 902-904.

Abstract

Morphological traits typical of Neanderthals began to appear in European hominids at least 400,000 years ago1 and about 150,000 years ago2 in western Asia. After their initial appearance, such traits increased in frequency and the extent to which they are expressed until they disappeared shortly after 30,000 years ago. However, because most fossil hominid remains are fragmentary, it can be difficult or impossible to determine unambiguously whether a fossil is of Neanderthal origin. This limits the ability to determine when and where Neanderthals lived. To determine how far to the east Neanderthals ranged, we determined mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from hominid remains found in Uzbekistan and in the Altai region of southern Siberia. Here we show that the DNA sequences from these fossils fall within the European Neanderthal mtDNA variation. Thus, the geographic range of Neanderthals is likely to have extended at least 2,000 km further to the east than commonly assumed.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature06193
Record Created:14 Jul 2009 12:05
Last Modified:12 Aug 2010 16:30

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