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Sulphur isotopic variation in ancient bone collagen from Europe : implications for human palaeodiet, residence mobility, and modern pollutant studies.

Richards, M. P. and Fuller, B. F. and Hedges, R. E. M. (2001) 'Sulphur isotopic variation in ancient bone collagen from Europe : implications for human palaeodiet, residence mobility, and modern pollutant studies.', Earth and planetary science letters., 191 (3-4). pp. 185-190.

Abstract

We report here on the first measurements of δ34S in small (<10 mg) samples of ancient bone collagen extracted from humans (n=23) and animals (n=4) from various European archaeological sites. Measurement of δ34S values complement collagen δ13C and δ15N measurements and can provide corroboratory palaeodietary insights or new locality information. In areas where there are clear δ34S differences between marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems they can be used to infer the consumption of foods from these systems. Also, as collagen δ34S values reflect local environment δ34S values, they can be used to identify the region where an individual normally resides, and therefore identify migratory individuals. Modern animal bone collagen δ34S values were also measured (n=7) and it was observed that such values may be confounded by modern sulphur pollutants, and we propose that archaeological material, which is free from modern sulphur pollutants, would provide appropriate baseline material for ecosystem studies.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Sulfur, Isotopes, Bones, Collagen, Diet, Archaeology.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0012-821X(01)00427-7
Record Created:20 Jul 2009 14:05
Last Modified:12 Aug 2010 16:36

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