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Spacing Palestine through the home.

Harker, C. (2009) 'Spacing Palestine through the home.', Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers., 34 (3). pp. 320-332.

Abstract

This paper explores connections that can be made between houses, homes and violence in Palestine, and representational consequences of making such connections. Drawing on ethnographic field research in Birzeit, I put recent work on critical geographies of home into conversation with geographies and geopolitics of Palestine. I criticise the tendency to represent Palestinian geographies almost entirely through the lens of the Israeli Occupation. While such studies have a great deal of value both academically and politically, this paper augments such work by developing a different focus and a different representational approach. I use detailed ethnographic vignettes and interviews to engage with the domestic practices that make particular Birzeiti homes. These intimate domestic encounters underpin my argument that there is a need for more work that apprehends Palestinian geographies as complexities that bear a relation to, but are not fully determined by, the Israeli Occupation.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Published on behalf of the Royal Geographical Society (with The Institute of British Geographers).
Keywords:Palestine, Home, House, Demolitions, Occupation, Representation.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (365Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-5661.2009.00352.x
Publisher statement:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com.
Record Created:06 Nov 2009 11:35
Last Modified:29 Nov 2011 13:16

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