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Ethnoscaping Canada's Boreal Forest : liberal whiteness and its disaffiliation from colonial space.

Baldwin, W. A. (2009) 'Ethnoscaping Canada's Boreal Forest : liberal whiteness and its disaffiliation from colonial space.', The Canadian Geographer = Le géographe canadien., 53 (4). pp. 427-443.

Abstract

This essay examines the construction of Canada's boreal forest from the point of view of critical whiteness studies. Through an evaluation of two texts—a film and a book—produced in conjunction with a 2003–2004 environmental campaign, it argues that the boreal forest is constructed as a white ethnoscape and that, as a result, boreal forest conservation comes to be associated with 'white' identity, although by no means exclusively so, and certainly not without significant contradictions. The essay deploys Robyn Wiegman's notion of liberal whiteness to argue that liberal white subjectivity is cultivated in these texts by its self-conscious distancing, or disaffiliation, from colonial spatial practices. It is argued that this distancing is achieved through the active inclusion of First Nations peoples in the texts such that the boreal forest is constructed as a socio-natural working landscape. Liberal white disaffiliation is explored through three specific tropes: inclusion, inverted racial historicism and economic partnership.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Published on behalf of the Canadian Association of Geographers/L'Association canadienne des géographes.
Keywords:Boreal forest, Liberal whiteness, Nature, Ethnoscape, Universality, Particularity.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1541-0064.2009.00260.x
Record Created:10 Feb 2010 14:05
Last Modified:07 Sep 2010 10:02

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