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An ethics of connection : social-nature in Canada's boreal forest.

Baldwin, W. A. (2004) 'An ethics of connection : social-nature in Canada's boreal forest.', Ethics, place and environment., 7 (3). pp. 185-194.

Abstract

Much has been made in recent years concerning the ecological significance of the global boreal forest. In Canada, a highly coordinated political campaign is under way to halt the industrial pressures—mining, forestry, energy development—that threaten to undermine the ecological contributions made by the Canadian boreal forest. In this short commentary, however, it is argued that the current politicization of the boreal forest cannot be thought of solely as an innocent act of environmental protection, but must also be thought of in terms of the colonial context from which its geography first emerged. Doing so raises problems for a conventional environmental subjectivity based on a sharp distinction between nature and culture. The author seeks to address this tension by advocating an environmental ethics that is based on a responsibility for the other.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1366879042000332970
Record Created:12 Feb 2010 15:35
Last Modified:13 Jul 2011 13:36

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