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The politics of the doorstep : female survival strategies and the legacy of the miners’ strike 1984–85.

Spence, J. and Stephenson, C. (2007) 'The politics of the doorstep : female survival strategies and the legacy of the miners’ strike 1984–85.', Community, work and family., 10 (3). pp. 309-327.

Abstract

This paper considers the legacy of continuing activism of women in the North East of England who organized in support of the 1984-85 miners' strike. It refers to the traditional responsibility of women in mining localities for the maintenance of neighbourhood and kin relations and using the example of a key activist in one ex-mining village, it argues that the values associated with 'mining community' remain relevant as a reference point for a self-conscious, politicized reshaping of local relationships in post-industrial conditions. The material basis for this self-conscious approach has shifted from the masculine sphere of mining work and its associated community institutions to the feminized sphere of location and neighbourhood.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Women, Miners' strike, Community, Neighbourhood, Kinship.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (387Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13668800701456252
Publisher statement:This is an electronic version of an article published in Spence, J. and Stephenson, C. (2007) 'The politics of the doorstep : female survival strategies and the legacy of the miners’ strike 1984–85.', Community, work and family., 10 (3). pp. 309-327. Community, work and family is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/13668800701456252
Record Created:15 Feb 2010 14:05
Last Modified:13 Dec 2011 09:22

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