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The problem of dual loyalty.

Baron, Ilan Zvi (2009) 'The problem of dual loyalty.', The Canadian journal of political science = Revue canadienne de science politique., 42 (4). pp. 1025-1044.

Abstract

Dual loyalty arises when a citizen or group of citizens holds political allegiance to another state or entity which could challenge their loyalty to the state. What defines dual loyalty as an accusation is the assumption that it is impossible to hold multiple political loyalties, but that, simultaneously, this multiplicity is denied any validity. This article explores the concept, locating it historically and locating the false and often racist discourse that characterizes its modern usage and meaning. <br /> Le double loyauté est quand un citoyen ou un groupe de citoyens sont fidèles à un état ou une entité qui pourrait aller contre leur loyauté à l’état. Ce qui définie la double-loyauté comme une accusation est la supposition que c’est impossible de tenir plusieurs loyautés, mais que, simultanément, cette multiplicité est niée aucune validité. Cet article explore le concept, par localiser historiquement et localiser les discoures faux et des fois raciste qui caractérise son usage et son sens moderne.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Political obligation, Loyalty, Minority politics.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (288Kb)
Full text:PDF - Published Version (124Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0008423909990011
Publisher statement:This paper has been published in a revised form subsequent to editorial input by Cambridge University Press in " The Canadian journal of political science = Revue canadienne de science politique." (42: 4 (2009) 1025-1044) http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=6845772
Record Created:22 Feb 2010 13:35
Last Modified:13 Dec 2011 09:51

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