Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

'To me it's just another tool to help understand the evidence' : public health decision-makers’ perceptions of the value of geographical information systems (GIS).

Joyce, K. E. (2009) ''To me it's just another tool to help understand the evidence' : public health decision-makers’ perceptions of the value of geographical information systems (GIS).', Health and place., 15 (3). pp. 831-840.

Abstract

While geographical information systems (GIS) have applications in a range of diverse fields, they remain underused by decision-makers in health settings. Through analysis of data captured in semi-structured interviews, the paper explores four thematic areas (the ontological, power, functionality and collaboration discourses) to understand how GIS are perceived and valued by public health decision-makers. The findings suggest that although GIS are viewed as useful tools to inform decision-making, they are in no way a panacea for practice. Participants’ concerns that GIS outputs can potentially be misinterpreted or used erroneously might partly explain resistance to their use. GIS are, therefore, likely to be most effective in decision-making when applied in a multi-disciplinary context to facilitate sharing of data, knowledge and expertise across the public health landscape.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Geographical information systems (GIS), Public health, Decision-making, Collaboration, Qualitative methods.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2009.01.004
Record Created:19 May 2010 11:35
Last Modified:27 May 2010 12:54

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library