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Anthropology of caesarean section birth and breastfeeding : rationale for evolutionary medicine on the postnatal ward.

Klingaman, Kristin and Ball, Helen (2007) 'Anthropology of caesarean section birth and breastfeeding : rationale for evolutionary medicine on the postnatal ward.', Durham anthropology journal., 14 (1).

Abstract

Investigating biology and behaviour in the context of evolution enables the public, scientists and medical professionals to better understand the impact of particular medical care on human physiology and emotions. Evolutionary medicine is a useful starting point because recognition of the possible mismatches between an individual’s predisposition to interact a certain way and the environment in which he or she is found can lead to practical improvements. Human parturition and postnatal care are salient examples of how culturally constructed beliefs can inhibit appropriate somatic and psychological support. Our research examines birth events, feeding strategies and the attitudes underlying them in order to better understand how modes of delivery and postnatal arrangements affect breastfeeding outcomes, maternal satisfaction and safety.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Birth, Breastfeeding, Infant care, Evolution and health.
Full text:PDF - Published Version (116Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://www.dur.ac.uk/anthropology.journal/vol14/iss1/klingaman-ball.html
Publisher statement:©2007 Klingaman and Ball.
Record Created:26 May 2010 17:05
Last Modified:02 Jun 2010 12:14

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