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Evaluating nurse consultants' work through key informant perceptions.

Redwood, S. and Lloyd, H. and Carr, E. and Hancock, H. C. and McSherry, R. and Campbell, S. and Graham, I. (2006) 'Evaluating nurse consultants' work through key informant perceptions.', Nursing standard., 21 (17). pp. 35-40.

Abstract

Aim To evaluate the work of nurse consultants in the NHS by exploring the views of key informants and nurse consultants. Method A multi-site evaluative study commissioned by and undertaken in four trusts. The evaluation was based on the 360 degree feedback process and used case study methodology, inviting key informants to provide information on their work with nurse consultants. Findings The findings are discussed in relation to the following themes: role aspirations and lived reality; challenging boundaries; impact and outcomes and leadership. The findings concur with previous studies demonstrating a series of common themes associated with leadership, clinical expertise, research and educational activity. These findings express the ways in which nurse consultants are working to develop unique services to meet patient needs. Conclusion The nurse consultant has an important role in the modernisation of the NHS. The role's impact, in terms of the informants, isin leadership, clinical expertise, research and educational activity. The findings reveal an urgent need to support consultant nurses in developing their leadership potential and skills in researching practice.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Leadership, Nursing, Management.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://nursingstandard.rcnpublishing.co.uk/resources/archive/GetArticleById.asp?ArticleId=6394
Record Created:14 Jun 2010 16:20
Last Modified:23 Jun 2010 12:02

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